Didirri Interview: Didirri’s Fast-Rising Success and How ‘Measurements’ Stole Hearts Across Australia and Beyond

The Australian artist’s star is quickly rising with just a single EP.

With just a string of singles to his name, Didirri is a rising singer-songwriter from Australia whose music has stolen the hearts of millions of listeners in his homeland, and beyond. Just in the past few years, Didirri went from busking the city streets to working in factories to selling out shows all across Australia, all because of his honest and raw approach to his songwriting and live performance.

The 23-year-old artist only has one EP to his name and is set to play some of his biggest shows yet. His songs are incredibly beautiful and cathartic, as his deeply personal lyrics and thoughtful storytelling seem to resonate in just one listen.

Didirri sat down with Blurred Culture contributor Rachel before his show at The Hotel Cafe in Los Angeles during his debut US Measurements tour, and first slate of performances in Los Angeles, for an intimate talk about his EP and fast-rising success.

How long has this whole Measurements project been in the works for you?

We released a track in May of last year, “Blind You,” and that was the kind of start of doing this all. But I’ve been playing for a few years, not really taking it anywhere and hadn’t put anything out. I was working in a factory back then and got fired. After that, I went on my first national tour a week after I got fired … and I got picked up by a guy who was touring, Jordie Lane, who I supported on his 10-show album tour. I emailed him and that was that. I haven’t had another job since and things just kind of blew up in Australia.

Tell me a little bit about your background and how you got started into playing music.

I studied classical and jazz on the piano from when I was three. My grandma played and I kind of grew up just doing that. I always had the intention of writing my own music but never really did. I started busking in Melbourne and that was [helping] pay for my university. I was doing covers and I just got really sick and tired of playing other people’s songs. You just feel really weird and kind of cheap when people are just putting money in the hat ’cause you’re playing another song. When I’d put one of my songs in the set, people would be really engaged ’cause I sang like I believed it — it’s my story. So I started writing [in the] winter after my first proper breakup.

I feel like that’s always the catalyst for inspiring writing.

It definitely is. I was living in a shed out of the back of my friend’s house and I recorded all these little demos into a cassette. Then my manager heard it, when I had too much gin one night on the couch. They put me in a room with a producer and I got on really well with them, started making Measurements, the EP, and I put out my first song “Blind You.”

We put out “Jude” second. A man named George Ergatoudis, he was the head of BBC Radio 1 and was running Spotify at the time. His son, of all people, sent him “Jude” and tweeted about it, and then my online [following] just spiked everywhere.

He sent me this personal message saying it was like the best song he’d heard in five years, and I instantly cried. I was just thinking about the journey ahead after that point, because I started selling out shows and now it’s crazy. I’m well touring off one EP.

When it comes to your music, what do you hope people gain? Do you have a message in mind you hope people get?

Most of my stuff is about self-care and taking care of other people. I like (…)

To read the rest of this interview, visit blurredculture.com.

Follow Didirri on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.
Stream Measurements online: https://didirri.lnk.to/Measurements


This article was featured on Blurred Culture.

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